• Charity - Christian Daniel Rauch, Bowman Sculpture Ltd
  • Charity - Christian Daniel Rauch, Bowman Sculpture Ltd
  • Charity - Christian Daniel Rauch, Bowman Sculpture Ltd
  • Charity - Christian Daniel Rauch, Bowman Sculpture Ltd
  • Charity - Christian Daniel Rauch, Bowman Sculpture Ltd
  • Charity - Christian Daniel Rauch, Bowman Sculpture Ltd
  • Charity - Christian Daniel Rauch, Bowman Sculpture Ltd
  • Charity - Christian Daniel Rauch, Bowman Sculpture Ltd
  • Charity - Christian Daniel Rauch, Bowman Sculpture Ltd
  • Charity - Christian Daniel Rauch, Bowman Sculpture Ltd
  • Charity - Christian Daniel Rauch, Bowman Sculpture Ltd
  • Charity - Christian Daniel Rauch, Bowman Sculpture Ltd
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Charity

Christian Daniel Rauch

(German, 1777-1857)

Carrara Marble
Height: 39.3/4" (101 cm)

Conceived circa 1835 and carved circa 1844

Provenance: Mr & Mrs John Howey Collection, Florida acquired before 1927 for Howey Mansion finished in 192; Mrs Marvel Zona Collection (d. 2015), acquired 1984
Private Collection, USA


Christian Rauch is considered the leading German sculptor of his time and the originator of the Berlin school of sculpture. He trained under the court sculptor, Friedrich Valentin and later studied at the Berlin Academy. In his first exhibition, his sculpture of Sleeping Endymion caught the attention of Johann Schadow, the sculptor of the chariot on top of the Brandenberg gate in Berlin, who took him on as a pupil and recommended him to the King of Prussia.

Rauch was awarded a stipend to travel to Italy in 1805 after gaining favour with the King, Friedrich Wilhelm III, who recognized the young sculptor's talents. While in Rome, Rauch befriended Antonio Canova and Bertel Thorvaldsen – the famous Neoclassical sculptors – and developed his own distinct style.

Rauch’s first important piece came in 1811, when he was commissioned to make the funerary monument of the 35-year-old Queen Louise of Prussia. Upon seeing the sculpture, Friedrich Wilhelm III was so moved by its likeness to his beloved queen that he burst into tears.

Christian Daniel Rauch, Funerary monument of Queen Louise of Prussia, 1811, Marble, Friedrichswerder Church, Berlin.

Rauch returned to Berlin after 1818 with a well-established reputation as an excellent portraitist. He quickly became one of the most sort-after sculptors for busts and statues of military officials, aristocrats and monarchs, receiving commissions from numerous European royal families. King Wilhelm, for example, commissioned six replicas of the head of his wife’s tomb.

Rauch’s most-famous work is the Equestrian Monument of Frederick the Great in Berlin, which was unveiled in 1851. It was restored in 1998 and placed back in its original setting in the boulevard of Unter den Linden, in Berlin.

Christian Daniel Rauch, Equestrian Statue of Frederick the Great, c.1839-51, Bronze, Unter den Linden, Berlin.

This sculpture, known as Boy with a Bowl, Charity, or The Camillo, was first created by Rauch in 1835 and commissioned in marble by the Grand Duchess Elena Pavlovna of Russia. The first version is now in the collection of the Hermitage. It is thought that at least five versions of the widely-admired sculpture were created in Carrara from a plaster model sent by Rauch, but that he finished each piece himself.

Working on a project in his local church in the town of Bad Arolsen, Rauch paired this piece with two other works of a similar scale: Faith and Hope. Other versions of Boy with a Bowl were commissioned by King Wilhelm, along with a pair of figures of Boy with a Bowl and Boy with a Book for his godson, Albert, Prince of Wales. Sadly, this pair was lost in the fire at Windsor Castle in 1992.

Christian Daniel Rauch, Charity, 1844, Hope, 1852, Faith, 1842, Marble, City church, bad Arolsen.

Another example is in the collection of Lord Lansdowne at Bowood House in Wiltshire, England.

Literature

Rolf Toman, and Markus Bassler. Neoclassicism & Romanticism: Architecture, Sculpture, Painting, drawings, 1750-1848. Dresden, 2007. Ullmann & Könemann, pp.280-285.

Jutta von Simson, Christian Daniel Rauch: Oeuvre-Katalog, Gebr. Mann Verlag, Berlin,1996. pp.25, 497-498.

Jonathan Marsden, Victoria and Albert: Art & Love, Royal Collection, London, 2010, pp.8-9, 36.

Peter Bloch and Waldemar Grzimek, Die Berliner Bildhauerschule im neunzehnten Jahrhundert: Das Klassische Berlin. Gebr. Mann Verlag, Berlin, 1994. pp. 47-51, 174-177.