• Torse Masculin (Masculine Torso) - Auguste Rodin, Bowman Sculpture Ltd
  • Torse Masculin (Masculine Torso) - Auguste Rodin, Bowman Sculpture Ltd
  • Torse Masculin (Masculine Torso) - Auguste Rodin, Bowman Sculpture Ltd
  • Torse Masculin (Masculine Torso) - Auguste Rodin, Bowman Sculpture Ltd
  • Torse Masculin (Masculine Torso) - Auguste Rodin, Bowman Sculpture Ltd
  • Torse Masculin (Masculine Torso) - Auguste Rodin, Bowman Sculpture Ltd
  • Torse Masculin (Masculine Torso) - Auguste Rodin, Bowman Sculpture Ltd
  • Torse Masculin (Masculine Torso) - Auguste Rodin, Bowman Sculpture Ltd
  • Torse Masculin (Masculine Torso) - Auguste Rodin, Bowman Sculpture Ltd
  • Torse Masculin (Masculine Torso) - Auguste Rodin, Bowman Sculpture Ltd
  • Torse Masculin (Masculine Torso) - Auguste Rodin, Bowman Sculpture Ltd
  • Torse Masculin (Masculine Torso) - Auguste Rodin, Bowman Sculpture Ltd
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Torse Masculin (Masculine Torso)

Auguste Rodin

(French, 1840-1917)

Signed A.Rodin
Inscribed with the foundry mark Georges Rudier. Fondeur. Paris. and inscribed © by Musée Rodin. 1963
Bronze with rich brown patination and lighter green, red and brown highlights
Height: 12'' (30 cm)

Conceived in 1882 and cast in October 1963.
The Comité Rodin states that only 11 casts of this model were produced between 1959 and 1963. There are no lifetime casts.


Conceived in 1882 and cast in October 1963. The Comité Rodin states that only 11 casts of this model were produced between 1959 and 1963 by the Georges Rudier Foundry. There are no lifetime casts.

This present work derives from the figure of the Homme qui Tombe, which hangs from the lintel on the left-hand door of The Gates of Hell, and from the male figure in the sculpture Je Suis Belle.

Rodin, L’Homme qui Tombe, Musée Rodin

Rodin, Je Suis Belle, Musée Rodin

The figure of the Falling Man was reused in order to model the sculpture I am Beautiful, which also utilises Rodin’s early model of The Crouching Woman. As the male figure struggles to hold the weight of the woman, crouching on his chest, Rodin focuses on the tension of his muscles. Indeed, in this truncated version, it is the striking modelling of the torso that captures the attention of the viewer, such tension being particularly highlighted by the highlights in the bronze’s patina.

Rodin became increasingly interested in the idea of paring down his sculptures to their bare essentials, often by removing limbs, or the head early in his career. This approach was an attempt to uncover what he considered the very essence of the human form and, as such, differed from the work of Neo-classical artists who often replicated the fragmented monuments of antiquity.

BRAFA 2019

January 25, 2019 - February 3, 2019

BRAFA 2019 January 25, 2019 - February 3, 2019